Let’s Talk Signage and Curb Appeal

public_restroom_signs_21Marketing is becoming more and more an online thing.  You spend time updating your website/blogsite.  You post pictures on Facebook.  You tweet specials at to your customers.  You make your Pinterest boards simply amazing.  These are all good things – and a great way to market your business.

When someone gets in their car and heads to your brick and mortar business, can they find you?  

whoop ti dos signage

Signage – are we using what works?  Is the sign on the front of the store high up on the building?  Did you know that people driving cars can’t see it?   Is your name on the window?   When the sun is shining, you can’t read it.  If it only has your name, does it tell people what you sell?


Blade signs are recommended.  These are the signs that are perpendicular to the sidewalk.  You can see them from your car.  Make sure they are no lower than 7 feet, no higher than 9 feet and no larger than 42 inches wide.  Use contrasting colors and
ALWAYS PROMOTE WHAT YOU ARE SELLING BEFORE YOUR COMPANY NAME!

An important point – be sure to check with your city.  Does the code ordinance allow these things?  If not, find out why and see if you can make a change!  Your city wants you to be successful and open conversation is so important.

demiLet’s talk curb appeal. Curb appeal is what draws attention and brings people in your doors.  70% of first time sales happen because of curb appeal. Try extending your inside to the outside.  Plant some flowers in pots and put outside.  Or bring some of your items for sale outside.  Did you know that women make 80% of all retail purchases?  What if you put a bench outside for the husbands and partners to sit on while the women shop?   This picture is Demi Monaghan and she works at Cornerstone Cottage.  They sell kids products (among other things) and she’s having fun with one of the games.  Could you put out an interactive product?

One more thing.  The public bathroom signs — use them!  Don’t put a sign in the window that says ‘no public bathroom’.  How welcoming is that?  Does that make you want to shop?  Let people use your bathroom.  Make your bathroom a fun place to use.  Make sure that fun extends into the rest of the store too!  When someone is using the bathroom, you have a captive audience.  What can you promote at eye level in your bathroom?

 

(I attended a Roger Brooks seminar in Pella last week and these were suggestions and ideas presented by Roger.  He is a tourism, marketing and downtown development specialist.  You can read more about him at http://www.rogerbrooksinternational.com/

Leave a reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.